Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd.
© Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. 1956 | Emergency call : 902 - 678-2731  |     cvet@eastlink.ca  |     sitemap
Equine  Vaccination

Vaccinating horses provides protection against

various diseases; some are prevalent in all types of

environments and management situations.  As

such, they threaten all horses whether they travel

off the property or not.

Those vaccines against diseases which are an absolute must for all horses are called “core” vaccines.  In our area of Western Nova Scotia, we would consider Tetanus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis as “core” vaccines.  The following is a list of various vaccines available for different ages of horses, and when they should be administered.  These vaccination recommendations change, or vary, between management situations.  Horses that come in contact with other horses, i.e. traveling for breeding or attending shows or trail rides, have different disease exposure than a horse that lives by itself without horse to horse contact.  Your veterinary advisor will help you design a program suitable for your own situation.  The first and second doses of vaccines are very important and if not done at the correct time intervals the horse cannot develop proper immunity. The Newborn Foal Tetanus antitoxin and Vitamin E/Se (not a vaccine) should be given within 24-48 hours of birth. Vaccinate for Flu, Rhino, Tetanus and EEE (Eastern Equine Encephalitis) at 4-6 months.  (4 months if mare unvaccinated; 6 months if mare is well vaccinated for Flu, Rhino and Tetanus) A booster should be given 3-6 weeks after the initial vaccine.  In some higher risk situations, the Flu (EIV) and Rhino (EHV4/1) are given every 6 months. Optional vaccines are Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus at 4-6 months.  Both need two doses, 3-6 weeks apart. The Yearling Booster in the spring of the year with Flu, Rhino, Tetanus and EEE. Flu/Rhino booster may be given every 6 months. Optional vaccines are Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus.  Both need two doses at 3-6 weeks apart for the first year. The Adult Horse First time vaccination should include Flu, Rhino, Tetanus + EEE.  These should be boosted in 3-6 weeks. Thereafter, repeat yearly with Flu, Tetanus, Rhino and EEE.  These are usually administered in the spring of the year. If Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus have been given previously these should be boosted annually. Note:  Show horses or those at high exposure risk for viral diseases (having exposure to different groups of horses) should be boosted for Flu and Rhino every 6 months throughout the show season or periods of high exposure risk. Mare in Foal The mare should be properly vaccinated and boosted several weeks before going to the breeding farm. Do Not vaccinate or give boosters at the time of breeding or during the first two months of pregnancy. The mare should be boosted with Pneumabort K at 3, 5, 7 and 9 months of pregnancy. Tetanus toxiod booster should be given 4-6 weeks before foaling.
Other Vaccinations to be considered are: Rabies – If the horse will be staying for a reasonably long  period of time in a high risk area, especially if pastured, then Rabies vaccine is recommended. Strangles – An intranasal vaccine is available.  This requires two doses, 3-6 weeks apart then booster annually.  This is recommended when strangles is a problem in the barn or surrounding area.
Additional Information Flu and Rhino vaccinations should be given intramuscularly.  To minimize post-vaccination stiffness and soreness the horse should be turned out after vaccination.  If the horse shows overall stiffness or soreness after vaccination, several days of Phenylbutazone (1-2 grams per 1000 lbs – daily) will usually alleviate the problem.  Hot and cold compresses can also help.  If the horse doesn’t want to eat or is reluctant to move, a call for veterinary advice is in order. Tetanus vaccination can be given in the centre of the pectoral muscles of the chest as horses usually tolerate an injection there very well.  Occasionally a small sac of edema will form after a chest injection; this will usually move down and disappear after a few days.

Currently we are using two lines of equine vaccines:

Boehringer Ingelheim Vetera – EWT EEE, WEE and Tetanus Vetera – EWT – EIV/EHV EEE, WEE, Tetanus, Flu, Rhino Calvenza Flu and Rhino Vetera EWT – WN EEE, WEE, Tetanus and West Nile Virus Zoetis Tetanus Toxoid Tetanus FluVac Innovator 5 Flu, Rhino, Tetanus, EEE, WEE Innovator WNV West Nile Virus Pinnacle Strangles (Strep Equine) Imrab Rabies Please consult us for a program that best suits your horses and with any questions which may arise.
© Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. 1956 | Emergency call : 902 - 678-2731  |  cvet@eastlink.ca  |  sitemap
Equine  Vaccination
Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd.

Vaccinating horses provides

protection against various

diseases; some are prevalent

in all types of environments

and management

situations.  As such, they

threaten all horses

whether they travel off the

property or not.

Those vaccines against diseases which are an absolute must for all horses are called “core” vaccines.  In our area of Western Nova Scotia, we would consider Tetanus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis as “core” vaccines.  The following is a list of various vaccines available for different ages of horses, and when they should be administered.  These vaccination recommendations change, or vary, between management situations.  Horses that come in contact with other horses, i.e. traveling for breeding or attending shows or trail rides, have different disease exposure than a horse that lives by itself without horse to horse contact.  Your veterinary advisor will help you design a program suitable for your own situation.  The first and second doses of vaccines are very important and if not done at the correct time intervals the horse cannot develop proper immunity. The Newborn Foal Tetanus antitoxin and Vitamin E/Se (not a vaccine) should be given within 24-48 hours of birth. Vaccinate for Flu, Rhino, Tetanus and EEE (Eastern Equine Encephalitis) at 4-6 months.  (4 months if mare unvaccinated; 6 months if mare is well vaccinated for Flu, Rhino and Tetanus) A booster should be given 3-6 weeks after the initial vaccine.  In some higher risk situations, the Flu (EIV) and Rhino (EHV4/1) are given every 6 months. Optional vaccines are Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus at 4-6 months.  Both need two doses, 3-6 weeks apart. The Yearling Booster in the spring of the year with Flu, Rhino, Tetanus and EEE. Flu/Rhino booster may be given every 6 months. Optional vaccines are Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus.  Both need two doses at 3-6 weeks apart for the first year. The Adult Horse First time vaccination should include Flu, Rhino, Tetanus + EEE.  These should be boosted in 3-6 weeks. Thereafter, repeat yearly with Flu, Tetanus, Rhino and EEE.  These are usually administered in the spring of the year. If Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus have been given previously these should be boosted annually. Note:  Show horses or those at high exposure risk for viral diseases (having exposure to different groups of horses) should be boosted for Flu and Rhino every 6 months throughout the show season or periods of high exposure risk. Mare in Foal The mare should be properly vaccinated and boosted several weeks before going to the breeding farm. Do Not vaccinate or give boosters at the time of breeding or during the first two months of pregnancy. The mare should be boosted with Pneumabort K at 3, 5, 7 and 9 months of pregnancy. Tetanus toxiod booster should be given 4-6 weeks before foaling.
Other Vaccinations to be considered are: Rabies – If the horse will be staying for a reasonably long  period of time in a high risk area, especially if pastured, then Rabies vaccine is recommended. Strangles – An intranasal vaccine is available.  This requires two doses, 3-6 weeks apart then booster annually.  This is recommended when strangles is a problem in the barn or surrounding area.
Additional Information Flu and Rhino vaccinations should be given intramuscularly.  To minimize post-vaccination stiffness and soreness the horse should be turned out after vaccination.  If the horse shows overall stiffness or soreness after vaccination, several days of Phenylbutazone (1-2 grams per 1000 lbs – daily) will usually alleviate the problem.  Hot and cold compresses can also help.  If the horse doesn’t want to eat or is reluctant to move, a call for veterinary advice is in order. Tetanus vaccination can be given in the centre of the pectoral muscles of the chest as horses usually tolerate an injection there very well.  Occasionally a small sac of edema will form after a chest injection; this will usually move down and disappear after a few days.

Currently we are using two lines of equine vaccines:

Boehringer Ingelheim Vetera – EWT EEE, WEE and Tetanus Vetera – EWT – EIV/EHV EEE, WEE, Tetanus, Flu, Rhino Calvenza Flu and Rhino Vetera EWT – WN EEE, WEE, Tetanus and West Nile Virus Zoetis Tetanus Toxoid Tetanus FluVac Innovator 5 Flu, Rhino, Tetanus, EEE, WEE Innovator WNV West Nile Virus Pinnacle Strangles (Strep Equine) Imrab Rabies Please consult us for a program that best suits your horses and with any questions which may arise.
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Equine  Vaccination
Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd. Cornwallis Veterinarians Ltd.

Vaccinating horses provides protection

against various diseases; some are

prevalent in all types of environments and

management situations.  As such, they

threaten all horses whether they travel off

the property or not.

Those vaccines against diseases which are an absolute must for all horses are called “core” vaccines.  In our area of Western Nova Scotia, we would consider Tetanus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis as “core” vaccines.  The following is a list of various vaccines available for different ages of horses, and when they should be administered.  These vaccination recommendations change, or vary, between management situations.  Horses that come in contact with other horses, i.e. traveling for breeding or attending shows or trail rides, have different disease exposure than a horse that lives by itself without horse to horse contact.  Your veterinary advisor will help you design a program suitable for your own situation.  The first and second doses of vaccines are very important and if not done at the correct time intervals the horse cannot develop proper immunity. The Newborn Foal Tetanus antitoxin and Vitamin E/Se (not a vaccine) should be given within 24-48 hours of birth. Vaccinate for Flu, Rhino, Tetanus and EEE (Eastern Equine Encephalitis) at 4-6 months.  (4 months if mare unvaccinated; 6 months if mare is well vaccinated for Flu, Rhino and Tetanus) A booster should be given 3-6 weeks after the initial vaccine.  In some higher risk situations, the Flu (EIV) and Rhino (EHV4/1) are given every 6 months. Optional vaccines are Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus at 4-6 months.  Both need two doses, 3-6 weeks apart. The Yearling Booster in the spring of the year with Flu, Rhino, Tetanus and EEE. Flu/Rhino booster may be given every 6 months. Optional vaccines are Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus.  Both need two doses at 3-6 weeks apart for the first year. The Adult Horse First time vaccination should include Flu, Rhino, Tetanus + EEE.  These should be boosted in 3-6 weeks. Thereafter, repeat yearly with Flu, Tetanus, Rhino and EEE.  These are usually administered in the spring of the year. If Pinnacle (Strangles) and West Nile Virus have been given previously these should be boosted annually. Note:  Show horses or those at high exposure risk for viral diseases (having exposure to different groups of horses) should be boosted for Flu and Rhino every 6 months throughout the show season or periods of high exposure risk. Mare in Foal The mare should be properly vaccinated and boosted several weeks before going to the breeding farm. Do Not vaccinate or give boosters at the time of breeding or during the first two months of pregnancy. The mare should be boosted with Pneumabort K at 3, 5, 7 and 9 months of pregnancy. Tetanus toxiod booster should be given 4-6 weeks before foaling.
Other Vaccinations to be considered are: Rabies – If the horse will be staying for a reasonably long  period of time in a high risk area, especially if pastured, then Rabies vaccine is recommended. Strangles – An intranasal vaccine is available.  This requires two doses, 3-6 weeks apart then booster annually.  This is recommended when strangles is a problem in the barn or surrounding area.
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Additional Information Flu and Rhino vaccinations should be given intramuscularly.  To minimize post-vaccination stiffness and soreness the horse should be turned out after vaccination.  If the horse shows overall stiffness or soreness after vaccination, several days of Phenylbutazone (1-2 grams per 1000 lbs – daily) will usually alleviate the problem.  Hot and cold compresses can also help.  If the horse doesn’t want to eat or is reluctant to move, a call for veterinary advice is in order. Tetanus vaccination can be given in the centre of the pectoral muscles of the chest as horses usually tolerate an injection there very well.  Occasionally a small sac of edema will form after a chest injection; this will usually move down and disappear after a few days.

Currently we are using two lines of equine

vaccines:

Boehringer Ingelheim Vetera – EWT EEE, WEE and Tetanus Vetera – EWT – EIV/EHV EEE, WEE, Tetanus, Flu, Rhino Calvenza Vetera EWT – WN EEE, WEE, Tetanus and West Nile Virus Zoetis Tetanus Toxoid Tetanus FluVac Innovator 5 Flu, Rhino, Tetanus EEE, WEE Innovator WNV West Nile Virus Pinnacle Rabies Strangles (Strep Equine) Imrab Please consult us for a program that best suits your horses and with any questions which may arise.